A reader writes:

The Ferris Bueller piece you featured recently is the latest example – in a sea of them as vast as the interwebs itself – of one of the single greatest developments to come from online content, in my opinion, a feature woefully lacking at The Dish, though its absence makes it no less indispensible. I’m talking, of course, about the comments section. Here’s one of the comments from the Ferris Bueller piece that I found particularly good:

1. “Why does Hughes feature as a sample of academic ennui the actor and conservative pundit Ben Stein’s explanation of the Smoot-Hawley tariff of 1930 and the supply-side economics of the 1980s?”
 
Wikipedia answer: Ben Stein’s famous monotonic lecture about the Hawley–Smoot Tariff Act was not originally in Hughes’s script. Stein, by happenstance, was lecturing off-camera to the amusement of the student cast. “I was just going to do it off camera, but the student extras laughed so hard when they heard my voice that (Hughes) said do it on camera, improvise, something you know a lot about. When I gave the lecture about supply side economics, I thought they were applauding. Everybody on the set applauded. I thought they were applauding because they had learned something about supply side economics. But they were applauding because they thought I was boring…It was the best day of my life,” Stein said.
 
2. Also, “bland girlfriend” – ? Can you please check yourself next time? The character of Sloane Peterson, played with extraordinary restraint and quiet dignity by Mia Sara, has most genuinely empathetic line in the movie [sic]: when Cameron flips out, she gently murmurs “sooner or later, everyone goes to the zoo.” She is coolly rational, yet utterly humane.
 
3. The many analyses and critical methods employed in this essay are all essentially as patriarchal in structure as the capitalist ideology under critique.

Another:

What of the “Save Ferris” meme, especially the high school kids giving up their money to buy Ferris Bueller a new kidney? Couldn’t that be seen as a nod to the middle class’s fascination with protecting the wealthy even to their own detriment? After all, who doesn’t believe the Buellers would have fine health insurance, yet here are these high school kids pooling their cash in a pitiful attempt to help one in need of none.

There are lots more. So, I’m dovetailing this into my official request that you enable comments at Daily Dish.  I know you have lots of smart folks as readers and it would sure be great to be able to read their thoughts.

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