by Zoë Pollock

John Borland reports on the DIY transhumanism trend, "the fringe of a movement that itself lies well outside the mainstream of philosophy, ethics, technology and science.":

For decades, transhumanists have argued that science and technology are approaching (or have approached) the point at which humans can take evolution into their own hands, transcending limitations of sensation or movement or even lifespan that are purely the accident of evolution. Some thinkers focus strictly on the “post-human” physical body, while others write of evolved social systems as well.

[Lepht] Anonym’s vision of the transhuman is rather different. Less visionary, possibly, but more realistic. What she does is “grinding,” with homemade cybernetics and an intimate familiarity with medical mistakes, driven by a consuming curiosity rather than a philosophical creed. She does her own surgery, with a scalpel and a spotter to catch her if she passes out, and an anatomy book to give her some confidence she isn’t going to slice through a vein or the very nerves she’s trying to enhance.

“The existing transhumanist movement is lame. It’s nano everything. It’s just ideas,” she says. “Anyone can do this. This is kitchen stuff.”

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