Bernstein suspects Republicans aren't serious about healthcare repeal:

Republicans certainly didn't hesitate to oppose the bill in 2009-2010 despite the support from several groups who are normally GOP-aligned or at least GOP-friendly. Will they fight against the interests of those groups now? Will they, if they win full control of Congress and perhaps the White House in the near future? I don't know.  What I do know, or at least suspect, is that industry lobbyists aren't really going to care one way or another about purely symbolic votes on the floor of the House. If that's all it takes to satisfy GOP activists, well, that's a deal that the lobbyists will be very happy to make.

So here's a question: if the GOP is prepared to hold purely symbolic votes, why not pass a balanced budget that the president is forced to veto? Why are Republicans unwilling actually to propose real cuts in entitlements and defense, the only way to fiscal sanity?

Or are they that unserious about fiscal conservatism as well?

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