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by Chris Bodenner

An Egyptian reader writes:

It's Khaled Said's birthday today, and people are using the occasion to carry the momentum till tomorrow. Khaled Said is a young man who was brutally murdered in the street of Alexandria last summer by plain-clothed policemen who found out that he got a hold of a video that showed policemen splitting drugs they had just captured from drug dealers.

The photo of the young man's broken face as he lays dead in the morgue spread like fire in the Egyptian blog sphere and in the streets. It gave a face to police brutality.

Today, he would've been 29. This cartoon shows a cake with Said's face falling on Habib Al-Adly, theĀ  longest serving minister of Interior in Egypt's history. An online group was formed on Facebook toProtesters-in-Egypt-carrying-photo-of-Khaled-Said-360x270 find justice for Khaled, it's called "We're All Khaled Said". ("ElShaheeed" means the Martyr.) After the events in Tunisia, when the people in Egypt and everywhere in the Arab world realized "Hey, maybe we can do that too," this group created an event page on Facebook calling people to protest on Jan 25 the "Day of the Police" (which celebrate police officers courage against British military in the Suez-Canal city of Ismalia where 50+ officers where killed in clashes in 1951). The Day of the Police became a national holiday in recent years and it was fitting to protest police brutality on the day of the police. About 80,000 people RSVPed the event on Facebook.

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