Arran Frood imagines the future of crowd-sourced nutrition and health studies:

A man steps out of a health clinic after his monthly nutritional profile. He slides a ring onto his finger and the injection-free technology transmits a read-out of his blood constituents to a central server. Skimming the data sent to his smart phone, he looks at the recommendation for his evening snack something with a little more selenium: brazil nuts, perhaps. He considers his diet for the coming week logged with his refrigerator and confirms an updated home-delivery shopping list. Finally, he tots up his credits for sharing this personal health data with a population-wide genome studyredeemable against the cost of his health insurance and nutritional supplements.

(Hat tip: Peter Smith)

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