Scott Rosenberg examines the news organizations on Twitter that first reported Giffords had been killed. He supports the fix proposed by Being Wrong author Kathryn Schulz in this Poynter interview by Mallary Jean Tenore:

Why not have a ‘correct’ function (like the ‘reply’ and ‘retweet’ functions) that would automatically send a correction to everyone who had retweeted something that contained an error?

Rosenberg goes on to explain why we need to figure out Twitter retractions now:

Every new style of online participation is born dangling from a “just.” It’s “just” a tweet, so why bother worrying about deleting it? But every wave of Internet-based communication that preceded Twitter arrived on the scene with a similar sense that it was more ephemeral than what preceded it. Save your e-mail? Why bother? Hey, edit your Web page at will it’s just data on a server!

Each time, we gradually discover that what we thought was casual has become an essential part of the record of our time. And each time we scramble, belatedly, to retrofit some responsibility onto our practices. Maybe this time we can at least shorten that cycle.

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