Leonhardt highlights it:

[E]ven those with health insurance experience rationing. How? In many ways.

This country has not spent the money to install computerized medical records, and we suffer more medical errors than many other countries. We underpay primary care doctors, relative to specialists, and we’re left stewing in waiting rooms while our primary-care doctors try to see as many patients as possible. Specialists are usually not paid for time they spend collaborating with doctors in other specialties, and many hard-to-diagnose conditions go untreated. Nurses are usually not paid to counsel people on how to improve their diets or remember to take their pills, and manageable cases of diabetes and heart disease become fatal.

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