A reader writes:

Unfortunately, I believe there is a negative side to the relationships among Apple, our culture and technology.  In the first half of the 20th century, the U.S. made goods that were essential to life.  In the second half, we made machines and software that made it easier and more efficient to produce those essential goods.  In both cases, the utility of the what we produced stretched far beyond the end-user.  However, over the past 20 years, much of our technology has been focused on facilitating our personal mirth via iPods, Facebook, widescreens, etc.  It may not be an accident that this shift in technology focus coincided with economic decline, because I do not believe these personal technologies bring as many positive externalities as do steam engines, cotton gins and inventory control systems. 

Or put more succinctly, what comes after "Here we are now, entertain us"?

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