by Patrick Appel

As an exercise, David Frum wrote an imaginary SOTU speech for Obama. One strong passage:

When my administration arrived in office in January 2009, we confronted the worst economic collapse since the 1930s. We did our best to estimate the depth of the crisis ahead. We got it wrong. As bad as we thought the recession would be, it was worse. We prepared for a fifty-year flood. We got a hundred-year flood. We thought our measures would cap unemployment at about 8 percent. Despite our measures, unemployment has reached almost 10 percent. Unemployment remains almost 10 percent.

The economists tell us that the recovery measures instituted by this administration have achieved dramatic results. Two of America's most esteemed researchers one an advisor to John McCain's presidential campaign, the other formerly a top advisor to President Clinton have crunched the numbers. They agree that our recovery plan stopped the free fall in the U. S. economy, saved the world from a new Great Depression, and added 2.7 million new jobs.

These are powerfully positive results. But not positive enough. So we need to do more and we need Congress to join with this administration as partners in the all-important mission of economic recovery.

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