Glenn Greenwald relates the story of an 18-year-old American citizen arrested in Kuwait for unknown reasons:

Mohamed says he was repeatedly beaten with a stick on the bottom of his feet and his palms, hit in the face, and hung from the ceiling.  He also says his captors threatened him with both the arrest of his mother and electric shock, and told him that he should forget his family.

He still does not know why he was detained and beaten, nor does he know what is happening to him now.

Indeed, although Mazzetti writes that he was detained and beaten by Kuwait captors, Mohamed actually has no idea who was responsible, and told me that at least some of the people interrogating him spoke English.  He has been told that he will be deported back to the U.S., but is now on a no-fly list and has no idea when he will be released.  American officials told Mazzetti that "Mr. Mohamed is on a no-fly list and, for now at least, cannot return to the United States." He's been charged with no crime and presented with no evidence of any wrongdoing.

If this were being done to a white kid by Castro or the Chinese or the Iranians, Americans would be up in arms and demanding answers. But a kid named Mohammed arrested by an ally in the War on Terror? Suddenly everyone defers to authority.

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