Egypt-al-jazeera

by Chris Bodenner

Robert F. Worth looks at how there is "little doubt" that the network "provided more exhaustive coverage than anyone else":

At one point, a correspondent warned that Egyptian security forces were poised to attack the building where the channel’s reporters were working. Anchors told viewers to switch to another satellite channel, and told them how to do it, in case its transmission was interrupted. ...

Both the Arabic and the English channel juxtaposed images in ways that undermined the government’s official messages. At one point, the screen was split. On one side was live video of a police van that had been set on fire by protesters defying a curfew, with the sounds of gunfire and explosions. On the other side was the scene being broadcast by state television: a quiet tableau of the night sky in downtown Cairo, with the message that a curfew had been imposed.

(Hat tip: Gregory White)

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