by Patrick Appel

Scott Lucas at EA is live-blogging again:

As the night drags on and the military keeps telling people to go home - and in one case to defend their own property -, the mood in Cairo seems to be one of defiance. Nobody seems to want to leave the city center and give Mubarak and his government the chance to come to grips with situation.  

The immediate task of the government isn't forming a new government - it's getting thousands of people who've practically halted the state's day-to-day functioning impossible [sic].  Right now, it matters little who's in-charge because Egypt is in utter chaos. With ElBaradei free, the police scattered, the military unresponsive and the thugs unleashed, communication systems disrupted and the world watching, the government is more vulnerable than President Obama and the West think he is. 

What will Mubarak do? But more importantly, what will he be urged to do by world leaders if the situation remains the same?

 

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