Ben Greenman satirizes the corporate paper trail:

[T]here seems to be some confusion between the paper shredder and the fax machines. The fax machineswhich have not been used for years but remain plugged in for some reasonare on the shelf by the restrooms. They are black. The paper shredders are on the desks near the conference room. They are putty-colored. Apparently, this distinction is not clear to everyone: two employees were overhead in the men's restroom earlier this morning discussing the "cool black shredders." There is no proof, of course, that any employee has actually used a fax machine while operating under the misapprehension that it was a paper shredder, or vice-versa, but if this were to happen, it would be quite distressing, primarily because the two devices have almost diametrically opposed functions: the shredder shreds while the fax machine faxes, sending copies of documents electronically to remote locations, where they are not shredded and cannot in fact be shredded, as they are not any longer physically present. A copy of this memo has now been posted on the wall next to both the shredders and the fax machines, as well as distributed to every employee. Please retain it for your records. Do not shred it. 

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