One belonging to the Mexican government has crashed in Texas:

"We are collecting data about the crash. We don't have the aircraft because it was returned to its owner," said Keith Holloway, spokesman for the NTSB, which investigates aircraft crashes in the United States and in other countries that requests its help.

Holloway said the aircraft that crossed into the U.S. air space is a mini orbiter unmanned aerial vehicle developed by the Aeronautics Defense System. It is designed for use in military and homeland security missions, and is capable of conducting over-the-hill reconnaissance missions, low-intensity conflict and urban warfare operations, and any other related close range mission.

Where did it come from?

Last year, Mexico spent $23.25 million to buy an "unspecified" number of Hermes 450 drones from the Israel-based Elbit Systems Ltd., Reuters reported in August. In July, the blog mxsecurity.wordpress.com reported that The Mexican Navy's Institute for Technology Innovation was developing three Unmanned Aerial Vehicles of its own, having previously purchased a "similar number" of UAVs made by Hydra Technologies.

It's getting easier to have an air force all the time. Let's hope the narco traffickers don't ever take advantage of that fact.

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