Adam Serwer contends that "on matters of national security, it is accurate to say that Democrats have for the most part learned to live with policies they once found abhorrent." He offers some examples as evidence:

The most egregious example of this, of course, was the debate over the PATRIOT Act. As I mentioned yesterday, you had Sen. Al Franken making a show of reading the Fourth Amendment to Assistant Attorney General David Kris before voting renewal out of committee. You have Attorney General Eric Holder, who prior to being AG said the Bush administration "acted in defiance of federal law" with its warrentless wiretapping program, only to narrow his critique when he became part of an administration eager to use the same powers. There's Sen. Patrick Leahy, who voted against PATRIOT Act reauthorization in 2006 but worked with Dianne Feinstein to block Sen. Russ Feingold's mild oversight provisions during renewal last year. The president who once wanted to repeal the PATRIOT Act then meekly signed its extension.

Democrats have, of course, blocked funding to close Guantanamo, fallen almost silent about this administration's aggressive use of state secrets to obscure government wrongdoing despite some early complaints, and have remained largely quiet about the administration's use of indefinite detention, once decried as "illegal and immoral."

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