Alexey Sidorenko has the disturbing story of Russian cops who came out on YouTube against corruption within the police force and have since been persecuted with "arrests, beatings, firings or criminal prosecution":

The story of ‘YouTube cops' vividly shows how Russian law enforcement structures react to the attempts of online whistle-blowers. [Alexey] Dymovskiy and his followers have not experienced the same glorious fate of Frank Serpico, a New York policeman who testified against city corruption. Unlike Serpiko, Dymovskiy has not received any awards, and his story has not been turned into a Hollywood movie (other than the movie he made himself, of course). So far, he and his supporters have been persecuted, marginalized, and their claims were ignored.

The kicker? A number of the YouTube cops have been involved in crimes themselves. This is Russia, after all.

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