The folks at Reason asked the guests who attended their recent event in New York City to define it. Their answers:

Interesting responses from a diverse crowd. But did anyone else raise an eyebrow at what Breitbart said?

I've always said it was political correctness, because if you can't speak openly and freely without being accused in a reactionary manner of being a fascist, or a racist, or a sexist, or a homophobe, or an anti-Muslim, what it does is it chills free speech.

This from the man who used a misleadingly edited version of Shirley Sherrod's speech to the NAACP in order to accuse the people listening to it of racism. This isn't to say that he is being disingenuous when he objects to false accusations of racism. Take a look at this clip from Bill Maher's show. He isn't acting. He is genuinely outraged at what he believes is a culture where liberals are constantly using the charge as a cudgel.

But look how he has chosen to respond to that belief: by in turn using accusations of racism as an ideological cudgel. It's a cycle without end. Until you end it.

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