We have entered a new age in terms of government information and transparency. Governments are now attempting to scapegoat Asssange or pressure companies like Mastercard to squelch the new asymmetry. They remind me of those running the record industry a decade ago or the newspaper industry five years ago or the magazine industry now. Barret Brown observes the radicalism of the change:

There is no period in human history that matches the years between 1990 and 2010 in the degree to which the common terminology used at end would have been unrecognizable to those who lived at its beginning... [T]he central dynamic by which each of several billion people may now communicate and collaborate with any of those other several billion people has already been established, and all that remains now is for more of those people to realize the implications of this and then act upon those implications, as they have already begun to do, even if the media at large is still having trouble with the former.

The Emperor still has clothes. He just has no control over whether and when they are removed.

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