by Zoƫ Pollock

Meredith Simons schools Palin on her supposed love for C.S. Lewis and why he wouldn't be a fan of her politics:

The British writer rejected the union of Christianity and government that Palin finds so appealing. As governor, her primary desire for Alaska was that God's will be done (particularly when it lined up with hers); Lewis said: "Theocracy is the worst of all governments. If we must have a tyrant, a robber baron is far better than an inquisitor." Palin believes the United States should base its law on the Bible; Lewis explicitly rejected the notion that Christianity is the basis of morality. "It is often asserted that the world must return to Christian ethics in order to preserve civilization," he said, in a pitch-perfect prediction of what current discourse would sound like on the Christian right. "Though I am myself a Christian, and even a dogmatic Christian untinged with Modernist reservations and committed to supernaturalism in its full rigour, I find myself quite unable to take my place beside the upholders of this view."

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