by Chris Bodenner

Dish readers remain vigilant. One writes:

I'm sure you've seen this already, but it's just too much not to share:

On last night's episode of Sarah Palin's Alaska, the former governor tried to explain how it was a simple typo that created the new word, "refudiate." She said she just mistyped a tweet on her Blackberry. However, the New York Daily News points out that Palin's memory "is not entirely accurate. Prior to her Twitter message, she misspoke the word on Sean Hannity's Fox News show while discussing the NAACP's stance on Tea Party racism."

Just another little lie in the life of a diva.

Another reader points to a less obvious but still odious whopper:

"Conservationists write me these nasty letters because I support an industry like this," the former vice presidential candidate said, after taking a chainsaw to an Evergreen Timber tree. "They write me these nasty letters using their pretty little pencils on their pretty little stationery not realizing. Where do you think your pencil and your piece of paper came from, people? It came from a tree that was harvested."

Really?

There are a significant number of conservationists writing letters to Sarah Palin "in pencil" on pretty stationary?  We're supposed to believe this ridiculous claim?  I don't believe the woman has received even one such letter.  Who sends letters written in pencil on pretty stationary?  (Oh, and in case she hasn't heard, many people buy pretty stationary made from recycled paper.  I do, though I can't remember the last time I wrote a letter in pencil.)

This is a dirty tactic repeatedly employed by Ms. Palin.  She invents fictional versions of people she wishes to ridicule and goes on the attack apropos of nothing. She must spend all her time dreaming up fictional people to throw to the wolves, satisfying the insatiable conservative hunger for hated enemies.

We'll leave it to the big guy to add to the official list when he returns from his blogcation next week.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.