by Conor Friedersdorf

The Atlantic Wire rounds up a lot of commentary suggesting that Barack Obama is in the midst of a comeback. It's largely from folks on the center left, and guess what? People on the right are arguing that, in fact, "there's no Obama comeback."

I'd ask everyone who has made arguments on either side of the question: why does it possibly matter? Can anyone make a compelling case for the importance of this conversation? Or is it, as I suspect it to be, an exercise in forgettable punditry that'll be completely without consequence and forgotten entirely by the time Congress returns next year? It makes some sense to focus on the horserace aspect of politics in the runnup to an election, or even when a consequential bill is coming up for a vote.

Why does it make sense to have the comeback argument at all? Seems to me like a lot of partisans making speculative arguments they'd like to be true, and a few political junkies weighing in to offer unbiased analysis without realizing that, given the high degree of uncertainty involved, this particular conversation isn't worth having.

On a related note, I wonder if it would be profitable to launch mirror sites called Catharsis For Team Red and Catharsis For Team Blue, where partisans on either side could go to hear a soothing voice – perhaps that woman who plays the call screener on Frazier – tell them whatever it is that they want to believe. This would be different from the existing iterations of the same concept that masquerade as ideological political magazines because there wouldn't be any claims to accuracy. The whole enterprise would be a lot more honest and ethically defensible. The motto could be, "We tell you pretty lies, and you like it." That need met, people could get start to get their news from more reliable sources.

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