by Patrick Appel

PPP's new poll isn't a surprise, but the size of the anti-Palin population is somewhat jarring:

[A] majority of voters in every single state we have polled so far on the 2012 race has an unfavorable opinion of [Palin]. And her average favorability in the Bush/Obama states of Florida, Ohio, North Carolina, and Virginia that are most likely essential to Republican chances of retaking the White House is 36/56. Democrats can only hope...

I'd prefer a Romney presidency to a Palin nomination. If you think the GOP is bad now, imagine the party remade in Palin's image. Even if she lost – which would be likely – the populist forces unleashed by her running would be beyond toxic. And, sadly, elections are decided on fundamentals more than candidates. If the economy tanks again, she'd have a shot at the White House. Were she president, congressional gridlock might prevent her from doing anything too drastic domestically, but as commander of the armed forces she'd have the power to provoke war with Iran or North Korea or whomever.

I understand why certain Democrats thirst for Palin's nomination. Palin's unfavorables, what might be called her reverse-coattails, could move several down-ticket races into the Democrats' column. But any Republican presidential candidate will have a chance of winning, however slim. She's much too dangerous to chance it. 

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