by Patrick Appel

Clive Irving calls Heathrow, which has experienced massive travel delays due to bad weather, "the perfect choke point to cripple the world’s air traffic." He gives some background on how the airport became "a shopper’s honey trap." And explains how "management of British airports was privatized and turned over to a company called the British Airports Authority." Irving blames Ferrovial, the owner of British Airports Authority, for caring more about shopping than flying:

While Ferrovial was loading up the Heathrow stores with all their Christmas goodies it hadn’t bothered to check whether it had enough plows to deal with two runways if, by chance, it happened to snow. Or enough de-icing fluid to get the airplanes out of the gates. Or anything else fundamental to fitness of mission. The cost of that negligence is almost incalculable.

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