A reader writes:

You can too take a date out on a bike, especially if he or she also rides a bike.  In fact, going for a bike ride is a great date in and of itself.  The lack of imagination of car-centric people in this country makes me crazy.

Another writes:

I wooed my wife on my bicycle.  My bike accommodates an adult passenger, and I rode her up Capitol Hill after taking in some art at the Hirschorn.

Another:

Living in Portland, a city well-designed and continuously improved for bike commuting (we even have a fantastic, well-respected blog dedicated to news about biking and the riding community), I have to agree with the reader's list of ways that having a car is helpful. However, the other readers' comment about taking a date out on a bike is less true all the time; I had one of my best days out with the dog, the sweetie and a rented cargo bike.

Another:

Dates by bike are liberating - no car to park, the freedom to have a couple of drinks with no remorse, the endorphins of a little exercise, and, in our case, extremely intimate when we ride tandem. (Here's a photo of one of our rigs.) There's time to talk and enjoy your surroundings together. Plus, like a convertible, the top is always down on a bike. With the right bike, even dressing up for the symphony or theater is not a problem. A midnight ride home on a warm summer night is about as alive as you can feel. With the right clothes, even a little inclement weather can't stop the fun. 

Another:

Several years ago I was working outside the town of Parma, Italy. I met a wonderful woman whose terrible English matched my terrible Italian. But we liked each other, and after some strained conversation, she asked if I "like bicycles," to which I said, "Yes," and that evening found us on a pair of bikes, flowing down the streets of Parma. A few days later we parted ways for good, but that date stands as one of these most idyllic in my young life. I remember every cobblestone and streetlight.

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