James Garvey interviews Wittgensteinian philosopher Peter Hacker on how infatuated our culture has become with neuroscience:

We are prone to think that if there’s a serious problem, science will find the answer. If science cannot find the answer, then it cannot be a serious problem at all.

That seems to me altogether wrong. ...[I]n the current neuroscientist’s view, it’s the brain that thinks and reasons and calculates and believes and fears and hopes. In fact, it’s human beings who do all these things, not their brains and not their minds.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.