Ezra Klein holds his ground:

People tend to form their impressions of how liberal or conservative something is by looking at how much partisan activity there is around it. And there was, of course, a lot of partisan activity around Obama's signature legislative effort. But if you believe "liberal" and "conservative" refer to coherent schools of ideological thought, the health-care bill was the most moderate universal health-care proposal offered by any president, of any party, in the last century. 

The empirical case against the Big Lie is water-tight. And it reveals just how successful - and desperate - the FNC/RNC's meme of Obama as some crazed far leftist is.

What this distortion of reality reveals is just how successful propaganda can be - especially when disseminated by a cable news network fused with one political party and directed at an epistemically closed niche audience. In a follow-up post, Klein calls out Republicans:

Democrats have been willing to adopt Republican ideas if doing so meant covering everybody (or nearly everybody), while Republicans were willing to abandon Republican ideas if sticking by them meant compromising with the Democrats. But because Democrats were insistent on getting something that would help the uninsured, they've ended up looking like the partisans, as they keep pushing bills Republicans refuse to sign onto.

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