David Frum insists that sooner or later conservatives will be forced to conclude that they should've cut a deal on Obamacare:

From a conservative point of view, there’s a lot not to like about the Democratic health care reform. I don’t like the new taxes to pay for it: a new tax on payrolls and a new tax on investment income. I don’t like the new burden on the states, in the form of higher Medicaid spending. I don’t like the plan’s steps toward price controls instead of price competition.

...But all those things I don’t like they are all the law of the land. To correct them will require action by the House, Senate, and president. That’s tough at any time, tougher when Republicans announce that they have no intention to compromise on anything. No compromise means no deals. So instead, Republicans will fall back upon a Plan B, basically a series of stunts... They’ll refuse to appropriate funds to implement aspects of health care reform. They’ll call hearings to publicize problems with the law and complaints from those negatively affected. And at the end of two years, the law will still be there, more or less intact.

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