Today on the Dish, Andrew rejected Adam Serwer's understanding of Awlaki. Palin earned more free air time from Bristol's rigged appearance on DWTS, while the dancing made this man shoot his TV. Bristol teamed up with The Situation to teach kids about safe sex, Bernstein ignored the polls, and Palin relied on Todd and God to protect her from all outside forces. Willow defended her mother's show on Facebook by calling a kid a faggot, while the show's producer insisted the show isn't political at all. Sarah Palin accused Obama of not being vetted, and Conor called her out for being the ultimate inauthentic politician.

Dick Morris exemplified stupid, James O'Keefe made our stomachs churn with his latest antics, and Hugh Hewitt followed the Palin model of press. E.D. Kain destroyed the illusion of a conservative movement on Fox News, the House GOP feared Obama, DADT wasn't dead yet, and Murkoswki prevailed. The pill benefited the budget and the environment, but the Catholic contingent of pro-lifers still won't allow it. Andrew argued a blogger's home can affect the output, and Hitchens regretted not speaking out against Mugabe. Noah Shachtman didn't believe scanners were keeping us safe, and Seth Masket argued it was really all about a humiliated professional class. Neocons supported START, Andrew recommended Bjorn Lomborg's new film, and answered global warming critics. Cheaters proliferated with the help of an anonymous source, and Americans borrowed money to sue.

Sullum briefed us on the war on meth, qat threatened Yemen's water supply, and Julian Sanchez was tracking his own burglar. Andrew articulated his gay version of hell, Four Loko was banned, a reader enjoyed the pirates' khat, and Christmas just got gayer. Writing about ignoring a royal engagement still counted as covering it, and beards encouraged foreplay. VFYW here, quote for the day here and here, cool ad watch here, MHB here, Yglesias award here, Malkin award here, and FOTD here.

--Z.P.

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