The WaPo has leaked details. According to the WaPo, the full report is due out at around 2:30 pm ET today:

According to a survey sent to 400,000 service members, 69 percent of those responding reported that they had served with someone in their unit who they believed to be gay or lesbian. Of those who did, 92 percent stated that their unit's ability to work together was very good, good, or neither good nor poor, according to the sources. Combat units reported similar responses, with 89 percent of Army combat units and 84 percent of Marine combat units saying they had good or neutral experiences working with gays and lesbians. At the same time, the report found that 30 percent of those surveyed overall -- and between 40 and 60 percent of the Marine Corps -- either expressed concern or predicted a negative reaction if Congress were to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" law, which allows gays and lesbians to serve in the military on the condition that they keep their sexuality a secret. 

Spencer Ackerman looks ahead:

There’s a Pentagon presser at 2 p.m. Thursday and Friday the Senate Armed Services Committee will hold hearings. First day is Gates, Mullen and the Defense Department report authors, Jeh Johnson and Gen. Carter Ham. Second day is all the service chiefs. Expect that to be when repeal opponents try to garner their talking points.  

John Cole zooms out:

 I get the sense that the gay rights battles are all going to end with a collective yawn, and one day we will look back and wonder what all the fuss was about. This doesn’t mean that I think we should stop fighting for ENDA, marriage equality, etc., just that I think there is not going to be a BIG SYMBOLIC victory and then the next day everything will be different. It just seems like people my age and younger simply do not understand the divisions based on sexual orientation nor care. As we become the majority and the new normal takes root, these things will inevitably change and we will begin to recognize the full spectrum of rights for LGBT citizens. I also recognize that my positions have become more liberal as time goes by, as I once thought civil unions were a fair compromise, but now will settle for nothing less than full marriage rights. A decade ago, I would have laughed at you if you said I would have donated money to the defeat Prop 8 groups.

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