Nick Summers profiles Jake Weisberg, Slate's chairman and editor in chief (and former fellow intern and editor at TNR and next door neighbor with yours truly). Summers tries to understand the head start the fourteen-year-old website had and where it finds itself now:

The site's internal numbers show that page views for October were up just 6 percent, to 83.6 million, and unique visitors were down 21 percent growing pains as the site weans itself from longtime traffic teat MSN.com and develops its own, more clicky readers. Over the same time period, Gawker has more than doubled its audience, and the Huffington Post has a global readership roughly three times as large. Through October, the Daily Beast racked up publicity with long, will-they-or-won't-they talks of a merger with Newsweek. When media people talk about the future of publishing online, in other words, they don't talk about the site with the 12-year-old CMS.

They do, though, talk about how awesome Slate is editorially. The site's daily fare unhysterical political analysis, Farhad Manjoo on iPhone stuff, the impish Explainer column, Doonesbury, TV dissections, Jack Shafer's bile is consistently smart, even if none of it seems remotely Webby. 

Josh Green, meanwhile, celebrates TPM's tenth anniversary here.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.