Mexican_Drug_WarPedro_Pardo_AFP_Getty Images

Mexico's regional newspapers aren't even reporting on gang members anymore:

[Regional journalists] said that with the central government unable to protect prosecutors and police, they feel forced to chose between personal safety and professional ethics. ...The analysis found that newspapers have continued to fill their pages with stories on crime. But in paper after paper, gangland-style executions went uncovered while reporters filed stories on minor crimes not related to the drug conflict.

(Photo: A forensic official checks the corpses of three men and a woman, found in Acapulco, Mexico, on October 27, 2010. An estimated 28,000 people have died as a result of drug related violence since President Felipe Calderon came to office in 2006 and unleashed the military against the drug cartels. By Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images)

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