A reader writes:

No "Imagine" yet? Banal, insipid, sanctimonious and ubiquitous - is any song of this type really more nauseating?  The bit when he pityingly muses, "I wonder if you can" is particularly grating. No, John, surely I cannot reach such lofty heights of intellectual vision as you have attained.

Another writes:

I have no argument to offer, except to quote Elvis Costello: "Was it a millionaire who said 'imagine no possessions?'"

Actually, a multi-millionaire in a vast, minimalist, white mansion. Personally, I have extremely mixed feelings about this song. Most times it makes me want to vomit because of its self-serving sanctimony and silliness. I mean: Lennon did not have to imagine, he could have sold every thing he owned to the poor as Jesus recommended to the rich young man. But life in the Dakota was somehow preferable. But I must confess that occasionally - if heard purely as a utopian fantasy - it can work. Musically, it's sublime. And then you hear David Archuleta's version and you're back to cleaning the puke off your laptop.

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