Not typical, I'd wager, of almost all on the religious right, but a voice nonetheless. A reader writes:

Though I am a registered Republican and a theocon -- indeed, in some ways precisely because I am a theocon -- I am going to vote for Joe Sestak in the PA Senate race today. It's not because I believe in Sestak. It's partly because I know the House is going Republican, and I fear Mitch McConnell more than I fear Harry Reid. It's partly because I know Pat Toomey is a really smart and capable advocate for what he believes in, and is likely to be entrenched for a long time.

But it's mostly because I absolutely will not vote for Wall Street.

I know, both parties are in Wall Street's pocket, but you cannot get more Wall Street than the former president of the Club For Growth, which Toomey is.

I greatly regret that Sestak does not share my views on issues important to social conservatives, and Toomey does. But to me, the greater threat to the family and to the integrity and flourishing of this society is an economy (and a political economy) devoted to the interests of the very rich.

I have been to this rodeo before. At the end of the day, what the Republicans really care about is Wall Street; my kind are useful idiots. I wish the GOP had learned the lessons of the catastrophic Bush years, but I see no evidence that they have. The last national office for which I cast a vote for a Democrat was Michael Dukakis, but I was a college student, and an idiot. I cast a write-in vote for president in 2008, because I couldn't bring myself to vote for either McCain or Obama. Today, though, my 22-year streak of supporting Republicans exclusively for national office comes to an end.

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