Reihan loves America:

Speaking only for myself, I prefer the endless potential for novel experiences and encounters that I find in the diverse neighborhoods I've had the pleasure of living in to the correlates of civic health one finds in more homogeneous neighborhoods. It's possible that my preferences will change if I have children, etc., as parents tend to place a high premium on the perception of security. And that's part of why I strongly believe that no one should be condemned for choosing to live in a more homogeneous neighborhood. Diversity-lovers will continue to concentrate in places like New York city and stretches of southern California, where civic health might suffer but the quality of life will nevertheless remain high. Diversity-skeptics will continue to concentrate in places like Prince Georges County, Maryland, home to a number of middle- and upper-middle-class African American suburbs, and states like Vermont, Idaho, and Montana.

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