Corey Robin contemplates it:

[S]ublimity depends upon obscurity: Get too close to anything, see and feel its full extent, and it loses its mystery and aura. A "great clearness" of the sort that comes from direct experience is "an enemy to all enthusiasms whatsoever." Get to know anything, including violence, too well, and it loses the thrill you got when it was just an idea.

... So long as the war on terror remains an ideaa hot topic on the blogs, a provocative op-ed, an episode of 24it is sublime. As soon as it becomes a reality, it can be as tedious as a discussion of the tax code or as cheerless as a trip to the DMV.

Robin also has an absorbing piece in Raritan on the radical tinges of Burke and de Maistre, among others.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.