A reader writes:

Your quote from Jason Chaffetz is both encouraging and discouraging. I am glad to see someone in Congress - anyone - discuss the possibility of investigating the horrors of the torture regime.  However, when he says "they campaigned against me, so I don't mind going back at looking at them," he seems to be saying that he would simply ignore it if they had been friendlier to him. 

One on hand, I'm completely unsurprised at that implication. But on the other, it is completely disgusting and so emblematic of many issues plaguing our government. "I won't investigate your lawbreaking because you are my friend/colleague" and "I will go after you because you are my enemy," - it's the political game of merely scoring points for your team and ignoring any actual regard for the truth or the law.

Another writes:

I find it grotesque that this is how people in positions of power make decisions.  He mentions nothing about the law, the Constitution, or the president's oath of office.  Not even the good of the country, national interests, or America's reputation.  Only that they didn't help him obtain power, so he'd be willing to investigate them. Fucking pathetic.

Agreed.

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