Larry Ferlazzo calls attention to an old and wise essay:

Its premise is that we need to be very careful what beliefs we turn into principles, because once they become a principle, we can’t really compromise on it. And that many people turn far too many ideas into principles that they are unwilling to reconsider. Subsequently, negotiation becomes out of the question, and unnecessary conflict often ensues. We can see it in our families, our schools, our country, and in our world.

The article is not saying there are no principles worth upholding. It’s just suggesting that we very, very carefully decide which ones they are.

He ends his piece by quoting Mark Twain: "It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”

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