Nils August Andresen documents "the GOP's brain drain":

Overall, the picture that emerges is alarming. In good universities across the nation, students flee the Republican Party. And the better the universities, it seems, the more drastic the trend. So if we accept that the trend is drastic, that it is real and applies to most of the top universities – and I think that is reasonable – the next question is: How did this come about?

It seems that, to simplify, Republicans have gone from having a clear advantage among top students in the decade following the Eisenhower administration, to being competitive under the Nixon and Ford administrations, to being an energetic minority during Reagan and Bush Sr. years to being almost eradicated today. There are many explanations for this. Partly, it has to do with a change in the youth vote overall – however, that is hardly much comfort to Republicans, but rather a source of additional worry, since it bodes ill for Republicans over the coming decades. This change, in turn, has to do with cultural changes relating to gender, sexuality and the role of religion in public debate. Partly it has to do with the inclusion of new groups in top education institutions, first black and Hispanic students, followed by Asians over the last few decades. However, in the case of Asian students it could be argued that Asians trend towards the Democrats precisely because they have higher quality education.

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