The quintessential Politico piece, with this page-view-begging lede:

[Obama]’s isolated himself from virtually every group that matters in American politics.

And core indictments of the Obama presidency like this one:

In June, during an East Room reception for top supporters at Ford’s Theatre, several of the attendees were disappointed that they didn’t get to shake the president’s hand and take a photo, as they had in the past. Instead, Obama greeted a few people down front, reaching over a rope line.

And this lovely defense of lobbyists:

While the lobbying community is usually covered by the media like a crime beat, most lobbyists are policy experts who often provide input on commissions and other advisory boards. So lobbyists argue that the White House shunning has cost the president valuable advice, political intelligence and institutional backup.

Look: there is a critique of Obama's presidency thus far, in terms of losing a core narrative. But this blizzard of petty Village resentments a real story? Josh is right. Blech.

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