From Amos Oz's acceptance speech for half of the Siegfried Unseld Prize in Berlin on September 28, 2010. He shared it with the Palestinian scholar Sari Nusseibeh:

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is a tragic struggle between two victims of Europethe Arabs were the victims of imperialism, colonialism, repression, and humiliation. The Jews were the victims of discrimination, persecution, and finally of a genocide without parallel in history. On the face of it, two victims, especially two victims of the same oppressor, should become brothers. But the truth, both when it comes to individuals and when it comes to countries, is that some of the worst fights break out between two victims of the same oppressor. The two sons of an abusive father will each see in his brother the face of his cruel father. And this is the case with the Jews and the Arabseach of us sees the other in the image of the former oppressor. ...

The disputed land is, altogether, smaller than Hollandyet there is no choice but to divide it into two countries, Israel and Palestine. The Israelis and Palestinians can’t turn into a single people living in a single country, and there is no point in trying to shove them into a double bed after a century of violence and hatred. No one would have dreamed, immediately after World War II, of trying to make Germany and Poland into a single country. The Israeli Jews and the Palestinians Arabs cannot, at this stage, turn into one happy family because they are not one, they are not happy, and they are not a family. They are two unhappy families, which is why it is vital to split the house into to smaller apartmentsjust as the Czechs and the Slovaks did without shedding a drop of blood.

Video from here. I'm more than happy to air dissents to its core narrative or facts. At first, I bridled at the word "colonies"; but if settling your own population on occupied land you conquered in war is not colonization, I'm not sure what is. As for the strategy of Judaizing Jerusalem, it also smacks of a kind of ethnic-religious colonization. I can certainly understand why the Palestinians and the Obama administration would regard freezing this process as a precondition for talks - because it is a change of the facts on the ground during an attempt to negotiate boundaries. You need a time out for genuine negotiation on settled terms. And yet the illegal construction of settlements for Israeli Jews in East Jerusalem continues. And the American Jewish establishment seems content to let the Israeli far right dictate the terms of negotiation.

Which guarantees failure.

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