David Boaz's pitch:

People have rights that governments may not violate.

Thomas Jefferson defined them as the rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. When I’m asked what libertarianism is, I often say that it is the idea that adult individuals have the right and the responsibility to make the important decisions about their own lives. More categorically, I would say that people have the right to live their lives in any way they choose so long as they don’t violate the equal rights of others. What right could be more basic, more inherent in human nature, than the right to choose what substances to put in one’s own body? Whether we’re talking about alcohol, tobacco, herbal cures, saturated fat, or marijuana, this is a decision that should be made by the individual, not the government. If government can tell us what we can put into our own bodies, what can it not tell us? What limits on government action are there?

I agree with every word. Especially when this "substance" is a fricking plant that grows easily on the ground. A government "banning" a naturally occurring plant - to which humans need do no more than pick it up and smoke it - is as absurd as it is grotesque. You'll be banning mushrooms next ... oh, wait!

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