The Economist interviews Damon Linker about his new book. Read the whole thing, but here's a critical point I've been trying to make for a while now. Fundamentalism is a real threat to liberal society, and without a revival of moderate, humble faith, we are in real danger:

History shows us that traditionalist religion can be compatible with various forms of non-liberal government (theocracy, absolute monarchy). The same can be said for strident atheism and totalitarianism. Conversely, when religion is liberalwhen it makes few supernatural claims, when it is doctrinally minimal, and when it serves mainly as a repository of moral wisdomit can play a significant role in a liberal society. But the relationship between traditionalist religion and liberal politics is far more contentious ...

A deeply devout Christiansomeone who places his faith at the centre of his lifewill tend to think of himself first and foremost as a member of the one true church working toward the establishment of the kingdom of God under Jesus Christ, if not in this life, then in the next. His ultimate loyalty will be to Christ, just as the ultimate loyalty of the most observant Jew will be to God and the Torah, while a Muslim’s will be to Allah and the Koran. Liberal citizenship at its peak, by contrast, requires devotion to the liberal institutions and democratically-enacted laws of the political community above all else. That’s why American presidents and other high officials swear an oath to uphold the Constitution and not natural or divine law of any kind.

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