Today on the Dish, Andrew marvelled at Obama's record thus far, even if his messages sometimes suffered for it. Andrew nodded in agreement with Douthat over climate change, and still believed conservatives should seek to conserve. Tim Lee and Andrew expressed concern over the rise of absentee ballots, and Christine O'Donnell was the perfect product of America's talk show culture.

Andrew stayed firm on the Chamber of Commerce foreign funding hoopla, while Wilkinson didn't mind the foreign countries watching out for their interests. Valerie Jarrett redeemed herself with her genuine apology, Dale Carpenter destroyed the myths about heterosexual frailty and DADT, and Andrew seconded this reader about gay pride parades as adult affairs. Jews and Andrew were in agreement over gallivanting, and Israel and America had a lot in common about not being able to see what's being done in their name. Obama didn't listen to his own advice on defense spending, Ron Paul may have been right about terrorism and military occupations, and Africa is officially huge.

Readers joined the tea with unicorns party on Clinton era tax rates, Paladino thought girl on girl porn was awesome, and Alex Gibney rewrote the Spitzer saga. Frum knocked Jonah Goldberg down a notch over his anti-elite elitism and Greg Easterbrook didn't feel so sorry for seniors. Foreclosure journalists invaded privacy but with good reason, and readers set the record straight on Rand Paul and Kentucky's meth problem. Starbucks slowed its baristas down, and the Kindle may be bringing the pamphlet back. Prohibition birthed Nascar, which Dish readers already knew, the Insane Clown Posse were awed by magnets, and W.G. Grace batted through the greatest sports beard ever.

View from your recession here, MHB here, VFYW here, opinions on the miners here, Drezner's Dish toast here, Juan Cole's here, FOTD here, readers on straight men fruit flys here, and Andrew on Parker Spitzer here.

--Z.P.

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