Today on the Dish, Andrew related to The Social Network (minus the coke orgies, that is), and revered authority only in the search for truth. Andrew butted heads with Serwer over what to call illegal immigrants and gays, and mostly rejected the rose-tinted worldview of the Tea Party. We considered the geography and the ideology of a two state solution, and heard a Palestinian's personal account of the revolution. The Iraq surge fail lived up to Andrew's predictions, and Goldblog nailed the difference between Islam and political Islamism. 

Chris Wallace held Carly Fiorina's feet to the fire, Andrew Ferguson did brutal justice to D'Souza, and Andrew put Tunku Varadarajan in his place. HRC consistently held up their double standard, and the Palin model assisted in the arrest of an Alaskan blogger. Democrat Jack Conway ran the ugliest Christianist ad of the season, fundamentalism threatened liberal society as evidenced by Damon Linker, and this British TV critic came clean. Mazzone dug into Gibbs on DADT, Mike Barthel didn't think It Gets Better for humanity as a whole, and Senator Michael Bennet played the gay issue in his favor. Kleiman and Yglesias unpacked Prop 19's impact on federal drug laws, and you can hear Dr. Donald Abrams on cannabis as medicine here. Jim Manzi fisked the NYT on economics, Larison went to bat for absentee ballots, and Ross pep-talked Obama staffers.

Privacy died in 1888, fewer babies might mean more carbon, and America bailed out GM for one venti latte per person. Daniel Kaplan questioned internet privacy, Lawrence Lessig loved the remix, and apparently we all love chicken dishes. Yglesias award here, VFYW here, shell art here, more views from your CPAP here, MHB here, FOTD here, and fake political ad of the day here.

--Z.P.

 

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