Patton Oswalt pens an unusal "It Gets Better" note, aimed at the kids who join the bully's entourage as a way to avoid getting picked on themselves:

And I understand exactly why you’d want to be on the side of the powerful, cruel and, by default, secure. It’s the reason why some poor people get angry about rich people having to pay more taxes. It’s why people join celebrities’ entourages. It’s why two oppressed, disenfranchised groups fight with each other, instead of the powerful entity that’s oppressing and disenfranchising them.

All of that is true. But it doesn’t change the fact that you have power if you choose to take it. ...

But you, in the bully’s entourage, can help make it better by taking away part of the bully’s power.

You can take away you.   And if you take the dare, and do it, you’ll be shocked to see how deep it diminishes the weight and scope and space a bully takes up in the world. And when you see that, and experience it, it’ll be your first – and unarguable – taste of how much weight and scope and space you have.

Over at the Smart Set, Jessa Crispin gleans a different message from the series:

What the backlash to the campaign misses is that it’s never a bad thing to create a chorus of voices of how life can be lived on the margins.

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