Roman Polanski's rape victim, Samantha Geimer, hates Polanski far less than many others do. Anna North takes a second look at rape as portrayed in the media:

[P]erhaps what Geimer's appearance ... should teach us is simply that rape victims shouldn't be held responsible for feeling any particular way about their rapists. It's not Geimer's responsibility to hate Polanski (she says she never did), to wish him ill, or to want him jailed. Instead, it's the court's responsibility to bring him to justice, and his responsibility to accept it.

In this case, both have failed and though some have pointed to Geimer's forgiveness as evidence that the whole incident deserves to be forgotten, none of us should forget that a rape case turned into an extended opportunity for rape apology because a rapist fled and a judge mishandled his job.

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