A reader writes:

Your response would have been more powerful if you had added what has become part of the gay lexicon: "When did you choose to be straight?" It is subtly subversive because it leads to the point your reader made, i.e. it is easy to get caught up in the hetero tide and never take the time to understand yourself better.  Does this lack of introspection go some way to explaining the 50% divorce rate, not necessarily on gay/straight issues but incompatible personalities, likes/dislikes, etc?

A reader last week sent the above video in response to Obama's "It Gets Better" message. Another writes:

I went to a mostly Republican, all-boys, jock-oriented prep school in the 1980s and had a head full of elite, white male entitlement.  I'd like to think that good teachers and a fair mind toward racial civil rights would have busted me out of that mindset had I been straight, but I'm empathy-challenged and have to admit that a great amount of my sympathy and respect for unfamiliar people came from the dawning realization that I was part of a minority group more despised than all the others. Putting down other people was just a defense mechanism that gave me an artificially higher spot on the social hierarchy.

If you had given a younger me the option to become straight, I would have jumped at it in a heartbeat.  A nuclear family with biological children had great appeal (still does), as did not suffering the indignity of homophobic nonsense my whole life.  But now, safely enclosed in a bubble of tolerance, I wonder if I wouldn't have otherwise gotten sucked into corporate law and become a permanent asshole.

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