Suderman goes after the president:

You might think that in a time of near-universal worry about the growing deficit, a Democratic president might take the opportunity to trim the defense budget by a few bombs. But holding military spending at its current levelsmuch less trimming it by the trillion-or-so dollars that experts say could be cutapparently isn’t on the table. Obama wouldn’t even include military spending in his proposed spending freeze. As an influential critic of military spending once said about the country's ongoing indulgence in defense pork, "Twenty years after the Cold War ended, this is simply not acceptable. It's irresponsible. Our troops and our taxpayers deserve better." That's true, and could be pretty good guidance for a willing politician. And all it would take for the president to follow it would be for him to listen to his own advice.

The caution is still there. And can you imagine the next GOP Congress taking on defense spending? There are some hopeful signs among some of the saner fiscal conservatives. But there needs to be a civil war within the GOP first. Meanwhile, the dollars keep coming.

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