Glibertarian Glenn Reynolds proclaims that the Tea Party "is now the single most powerful political force in the nation." It's certainly an influential force in the 2010 midterms. As yet, however, it hasn't actually accomplished anything. And few of its candidates have offered specific proposals for cutting spending, while most of them backing extremist Christianism to the hilt.

One exception worth noting is Rand Paul, who said this, to his credit, in a recent debate:

Mr. Paul said he would raise the retirement age for Social Security and Medicare he did not say to what age and the deductibles for Medicare, casting these steps as the responsible approach.

Not exactly up to the standards of the British Tories, but much better than most. And if there is no specific mandate for actual cuts - especially the brutal kind necessary tobalance the budget without any tax increases - what hope on earth is there for these people to actually do what they abstractly say they want to do?

It's probably wise to postpone the victory parade for small government, just as it was wise not to celebrate "victory" in Iraq as that country now descends toward another dictatorship - this one, closely allied with Iran.

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