Duskalone

“After The Day’s Business,” by Richard Hovey first appeared in The Atlantic Monthly in August of 1898:

When I sit down with thee at last alone,
Shut out the wrangle of the clashing day,
The scrape of petty jars that fret and fray,
The snarl and yelp of brute beasts for a bone, --
When thou and I sit down at last alone,
And through the dusk of rooms divinely gray
Spirit to spirit finds its voiceless way
As tone melts meeting in accordant tone,
Oh, then our souls far in the vast of sky
Look from a tower too high for sound of strife
Or any violation of the town,
Where the great vacant winds of God go by,
And over the huge misshapen city of life
Love pours his silence and his moonlight down.

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